Making the Invisible, Visible.

There are so many information and data that we encounter in our every day life. The format that we encounter these information and data vary depends on how we publish them. Today, we make it visible through visualization. Rather than simply explaining to the audience by words, visualization allows for the audiences to capture the idea, fact, statics or any kinds of information in a more easier, convenient and effective way. Visualization helps us to discover the unknown via image and due to this we can create already existing patterns of data and form a new relationship.

The issue of climate change can be an example of clearly delivering information in such visualization of graphs, data, tables and images in order to deliver the complex, and scientific information in a understandable way to the audiences.

Since there are numerous data and information about the climate change, it is getting harder and harder to having own opinions. However, visualisation allows us to visit websites and blogs that have gathered, created and published visuals, graphs, photographs and videos that helps us forming our opinion.

스크린샷 2014-10-30 8.12.31 PM

Following info graphic helps us to build our own opinion and broaden our insights on climate change issues. This information, a compilation of data in different formation such as maps, scientific diagrams, and graphs is created by David McCanless (2009). (http://www.informationisbeautiful.net/visualizations/climate-change-deniers-vs-the-consensus/)

Visual media has the power to draw audience’s attention in one glance, evoke emotion and help form our own opinion. Also, technological advances has also fostered the visual media to reach the audiences constantly through new devices such as mobile smart phones, tablet pc and so on.

Reference:

McCandless, D, White, P 2009, ‘Climate Change Deniers vs. The Consensus, Information Is Beautiful, http://www.informationisbeautiful.net/visualizations/climate-change-deniers-vs-the-consensus/, last accessed 18th of September 2014

Virilio, Paul (1997) ‘Eye lust’ in Open Sky London: Verson: 89-90

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